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November 1969 - 1974

Idents/Clocks [1]

The launch of a colour BBC One service on 15th November 1969 brought with it a new on-air look for the channel. At midnight on that date, viewers were introduced to the new channel symbol - a mechanical globe device.

Above: BBC One ident [November 1969 - 1972]. The example shown here is from November 1969.

Above: BBC One clock [November 1969 - 1972]. The example shown here is from November 1969.

Above: the physical BBC One mechanical globe symbol [left] in the 'Noddy' room [1971]. Worth noting that the 'BBC1' logo had changed slightly by 1971 - the three lozenges now had slightly more rounded edges. Alongside the familiar 'BBC1 COLOUR' symbol, we see another BBC One globe device [right]. This version - minus the 'COLOUR' legend - is believed to have been used to introduce programmes that were produced in black and white (mainly Schools programmes, which were still in black and white). Unfortunately, we have no footage of this symbol.

Above: BBC One Schools and Colleges presentation [early-1960s - early-1970s]. With apologies for the poor picture quality on these images. The 'Pie Chart' [left] would appear between schools programmes, accompanied by music, to be followed by a countdown clock [right] which ran for one minute, also accompanied by music.

Above: BBC One ident [1972 - 1974]. Identical to the previous version of the ident, bar the italicised 'COLOUR' legend.

Above: BBC One clock [1] [1972 - 1974].

Above: BBC One clock [2] [1972 - 1974].

Above: BBC One clock [3] [TX: 7th February 1974]. Here we see the clock used to introduce programmes that were broadcast in black and white - hence the lack of 'COLOUR' legend. In this case, it was an edition of 'Blue Peter'.

Above: BBC One Schools and Colleges Diamond [September 1974 - December 1974]. The 'Diamond' device is believed to have been introduced in September 1974 to mark the introduction of colour schools programmes. It replaced the 'Pie Chart' in the junctions between schools programmes on BBC One. The animating diamonds were produced by a mechanical model. It was transmitted live.

Two pieces of music accompanied the Diamond animation: 'Sara's Tune' for primary school programmes and 'A Tune for Lucy' for secondary school programmes. The diamonds animation lasted one minute. However, the device was often on screen for slightly longer than that in a typical junction. 'Sarah's Tune' was composed by David Lord and was just under 2 minutes in duration. In each junction, it was usual practice for the Diamond model to appear minus the diamonds. The three large diamonds - the starting point for the animation - would almost immediately animate into view and would remain static until one minute before the programme started.